Neurolnguistic Applications to SLA Classroom Instructions: A Review of the Issues with a Focus on Danesis Bimodality

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Few studies have approached second language teaching from a neurolinguistic perspective. An exception is Marcel Danesis educational construct of neurological bimodality, an attempt to find a neurological foundation for classroom language instruction. The underlying hypothesis is that there is a natural flow of information processing from the right to the left hemispheres of the brain during language learning; therefore, language instruction should reflect that flow direction by providing concrete forms of instruction at early language learning stages and more formal and abstract instruction at later stages. However, the hypothesis raises questions; for example, the evidence for right-hemisphere functions in second language learning is contradictory, yet those functions are an important element in bimodality. In addition, there have been few empirical studies supporting the hypothesis.
Publisher
University of Texas at Austin
Issue Date
1998-03
Language
English
Citation

TEXAS PAPERS IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION, v.3, no.2, pp.91 - 103

ISSN
0898-8471
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10203/67838
Appears in Collection
HSS-Journal Papers(저널논문)
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