The emergence of division of labour through decentralized social sanctioning

Cited 0 time in webofscience Cited 0 time in scopus
  • Hit : 110
  • Download : 0
Human ecological success relies on our characteristic ability to flexibly self-organize into cooperative social groups, the most successful of which employ substantial specialization and division of labour. Unlike most other animals, humans learn by trial and error during their lives what role to take on. However, when some critical roles are more attractive than others, and individuals are self-interested, then there is a social dilemma: each individual would prefer others take on the critical but unremunerative roles so they may remain free to take one that pays better. But disaster occurs if all act thus and a critical role goes unfilled. In such situations learning an optimum role distribution may not be possible. Consequently, a fundamental question is: how can division of labour emerge in groups of self-interested lifetime-learning individuals? Here, we show that by introducing a model of social norms, which we regard as emergent patterns of decentralized social sanctioning, it becomes possible for groups of self-interested individuals to learn a productive division of labour involving all critical roles. Such social norms work by redistributing rewards within the population to disincentivize antisocial roles while incentivizing prosocial roles that do not intrinsically pay as well as others. © 2023 The Authors.
Publisher
ROYAL SOC
Issue Date
2023-10
Language
English
Article Type
Article
Citation

PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, v.290, no.2009

ISSN
0962-8452
DOI
10.1098/rspb.2023.1716
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10203/316208
Appears in Collection
BC-Journal Papers(저널논문)
Files in This Item
There are no files associated with this item.

qr_code

  • mendeley

    citeulike


rss_1.0 rss_2.0 atom_1.0