Recurrent pattern of extreme fire weather in California

Cited 10 time in webofscience Cited 0 time in scopus
  • Hit : 243
  • Download : 0
Historical wildfire events in California have shown a tendency to occur every five to seven years with a rapidly increasing tendency in recent decades. This oscillation is evident in multiple historical climate records, some more than a century long, and appears to be continuing. Analysis shows that this 5-7 year oscillation is linked to a sequence of anomalous large-scale climate patterns with an eastward propagation in both the ocean and atmosphere. While warmer temperature emerges from the northern central Pacific to the west coast of California, La Nina pattern develops simultaneously, implying that the lifecycle of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation that takes multiple years to form could be a trigger. The evolving patterns of the Pacific-to-North America atmospheric teleconnection suggest the role of tropical and subtropical forcing embedded in this lifecycle. These results highlight the semi-cyclical hydrological behavior as a climate driver for wildfire variability in California.
Publisher
IOP PUBLISHING LTD
Issue Date
2021-09
Language
English
Article Type
Article
Citation

ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS, v.16, no.9

ISSN
1748-9326
DOI
10.1088/1748-9326/ac1f44
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10203/287772
Appears in Collection
RIMS Journal Papers
Files in This Item
There are no files associated with this item.
This item is cited by other documents in WoS
⊙ Detail Information in WoSⓡ Click to see webofscience_button
⊙ Cited 10 items in WoS Click to see citing articles in records_button

qr_code

  • mendeley

    citeulike


rss_1.0 rss_2.0 atom_1.0