Effects of working posture, lifting load, and standing surface on postural instability during simulated lifting tasks in construction

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Postural instability is a major contributor to fatal and nonfatal falls in the construction industry. This study investigated the effects of working posture, lifting load and standing surface on perceived postural instability. Thirty young males performed simulated lifting tasks in construction using six different postures under four experimental conditions (2 loads x 2 surfaces). Results showed working postures with bending at the waist and overhead carrying were associated with high postural instability. With lifting load and inclined standing surface both significantly increased postural instability for all working postures except the full squatting. Full squatting with lifting load was more stable than without load for the flat surface, but opposite for the inclined surface. These findings indicate three investigated factors had not only significant main effects, but also complicated interaction effects on postural instability, implying that all three factors should be considered simultaneously for the real practice on fall prevention in construction. Practitioner summary:The leading causes of worker deaths in the construction industry were falls. This study showed that working postures with waist bending and overhead carrying were associated with high postural instability. With lifting load and inclined standing surface both significantly increased postural instability for all working postures except the full squatting.
Publisher
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD
Issue Date
2020-12
Language
English
Article Type
Article
Citation

ERGONOMICS, v.63, no.12, pp.1571 - 1583

ISSN
0014-0139
DOI
10.1080/00140139.2020.1807614
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10203/279343
Appears in Collection
IE-Journal Papers(저널논문)
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