Cellular and systemic mechanisms for glucose sensing and homeostasis

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Glucose is a major source of energy in animals. Maintaining blood glucose levels within a physiological range is important for facilitating glucose uptake by cells, as required for optimal functioning. Glucose homeostasis relies on multiple glucose-sensing cells in the body that constantly monitor blood glucose levels and respond accordingly to adjust its glycemia. These include not only pancreatic beta-cells and alpha-cells that secrete insulin and glucagon, but also central and peripheral neurons regulating pancreatic endocrine function. Different types of cells respond distinctively to changes in blood glucose levels, and the mechanisms involved in glucose sensing are diverse. Notably, recent studies have challenged the currently held views regarding glucose-sensing mechanisms. Furthermore, peripheral and central glucose-sensing cells appear to work in concert to control blood glucose level and maintain glucose and energy homeostasis in organisms. In this review, we summarize the established concepts and recent advances in the understanding of cellular and systemic mechanisms that regulate glucose sensing and its homeostasis.
Publisher
SPRINGER HEIDELBERG
Issue Date
2020-11
Language
English
Article Type
Review
Citation

PFLUGERS ARCHIV-EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY, v.472, no.11, pp.1547 - 1561

ISSN
0031-6768
DOI
10.1007/s00424-020-02466-2
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10203/276863
Appears in Collection
BS-Journal Papers(저널논문)
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