Children's use of geometry for reorientation

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Research on navigation has shown that humans and laboratory animals recover their sense of orientation primarily by detecting geometric properties of large-scale surface layouts (e.g. room shape), but the reasons for the primacy of layout geometry have not been clarified. In four experiments, we tested whether 4-year-old children reorient by the geometry of extended wall-like surfaces because such surfaces are large and perceived as stable, because they serve as barriers to vision or to locomotion, or because they form a single, connected geometric figure. Disoriented children successfully reoriented by the shape of an arena formed by surfaces that were short enough to see and step over. In contrast, children failed to reorient by the shape of an arena defined by large and stable columns or by connected lines on the floor. We conclude that preschool children's reorientation is not guided by the functional relevance of the immediate environmental properties, but rather by a specific sensitivity to the geometric properties of the extended three-dimensional surface layout.
Publisher
WILEY
Issue Date
2008-09
Language
English
Article Type
Article
Citation

DEVELOPMENTAL SCIENCE, v.11, no.5, pp.743 - 749

ISSN
1363-755X
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-7687.2008.00724.x
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10203/267779
Appears in Collection
BiS-Journal Papers(저널논문)
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