Fabricating Genetically Engineered High-Power Lithium-Ion Batteries Using Multiple Virus Genes

Development of materials that deliver more energy at high rates is important for high-power applications, including portable electronic devices and hybrid electric vehicles. For lithium-ion (Li(+)) batteries, reducing material dimensions can boost Li(+) ion and electron transfer in nanostructured electrodes. By manipulating two genes, we equipped viruses with peptide groups having affinity for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on one end and peptides capable of nucleating amorphous iron phosphate (a-FePO(4)) fused to the viral major coat protein. The virus clone with the greatest affinity toward SWNTs enabled power performance of a-FePO(4) comparable to that of crystalline lithium iron phosphate (c-LiFePO(4)) and showed excellent capacity retention upon cycling at 1C. This environmentally benign low-temperature biological scaffold could facilitate fabrication of electrodes from materials previously excluded because of extremely low electronic conductivity.
Publisher
AMER ASSOC ADVANCEMENT SCIENCE
Issue Date
2009-05
Language
ENG
Keywords

CARBON NANOTUBE; ELECTRODE PERFORMANCE; HIGH-CAPACITY; PEPTIDES; CATHODE; FEPO4

Citation

SCIENCE, v.324, no.5930, pp.1051 - 1055

ISSN
0036-8075
DOI
10.1126/science.1171541
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10203/9453
Appears in Collection
MS-Journal Papers(저널논문)
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