The test taker's fallacy: How students guess answers on multiple-choice tests

Cited 0 time in webofscience Cited 0 time in scopus
  • Hit : 101
  • Download : 0
Many students and applicants take multiple-choice tests to demonstrate their competence and achievement. When they are unsure, they guess the most likely answer to maximize their score. Despite the impact of guessing on test reliability and individual performance, studies have not examined how patterns of answer sequences in multiple-choice tests affect guessing. This research presents the test taker's fallacy, which refers to an individual's tendency to expect a different answer to appear for the next question given a run of the same answer choices. The test taker's fallacy exhibits negative recency, similar to the gambler's fallacy. However, extending the sequential judgment literature, the test taker's fallacy shows that negative recency arises even when sequences may or may not be randomly generated. In three studies, including a survey and experiments, the test taker's fallacy is robustly observed. The test taker's fallacy is consistent with the operation of the representativeness heuristic. This research explains what and how test takers guess given a streak of answers and extends judgment under uncertainty to the test-taking context.
Publisher
WILEY
Issue Date
2019-04
Language
English
Article Type
Article
Citation

JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL DECISION MAKING, v.32, no.2, pp.140 - 151

ISSN
0894-3257
DOI
10.1002/bdm.2101
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10203/253951
Appears in Collection
MT-Journal Papers(저널논문)
Files in This Item
There are no files associated with this item.

qr_code

  • mendeley

    citeulike


rss_1.0 rss_2.0 atom_1.0